NFG Member Spotlight: The Jacob & Valeria Langeloth Foundation

The Jacob & Valeria Langeloth Foundation focuses on health and well-being, prioritizing correctional health issues along with chronic violence and community health.

We asked Langeloth's President, Scott Moyer, to talk about their work and how membership with NFG is shaping their thinking.


Langeloth is part of a number of funder collaboratives, including the Fund for a Safer Future (addressing gun violence), Four Freedoms Fund (supporting immigrant rights), and the Funders’ Collaborative on Youth Organizing/Youth for Safety and Justice Fund (rapid response funding to youth-led safety and justice organizing), among others. How does Langeloth see collaborative funds as valuable pathways to learning about entering these funding spaces?

Funder collaboratives are a useful vehicle for entering a funding area in which we don’t have a lot of knowledge or exposure. In addition to ensuring that funding goes to organizations in need, they also provide access to other funders and a community to learn more about a particular field. We are a better grantmaker as a result of being part of these collaboratives.

Can you share more about Langeloth’s rapid response work, including why rapid response funding is so critical at this moment?

Langeloth established a rapid response fund for urgent needs related to politically-motivated actions. We only have two Board meetings per year and some work can’t wait months to be funded. For example, the foundation coordinated with other funders from the Fund for a Safer Future to identify organizations poised to act after the Parkland, FL shooting.  We made several grants to organizations serving youth of color, as well as one to conduct voter registration at the marches across the county. More recently, with guidance from the Four Freedoms Fund, we awarded several grants to organizations responding to the immigrant detention and family separation crisis in the border states.

In what ways has Langeloth increased its focus on supporting organizations from directly impacted communities – and what has the result been in terms of the impact of Langeloth’s funding?

This is an area of funding to which we have recently dedicated more time. We have been looking more intentionally at funding organizations serving men and boys of color as part of our community violence programming. Our focus recently has been on youth leadership development, as well as initiatives seeking to change the narrative around violence and the portrayal of men and boys of color. We are early on in this journey but believe that it is critical to support directly impacted communities as part of the solution.

Finally, share a bit about Langeloth’s history with NFG – how has NFG membership enhanced Langeloth’s learning and influenced the way you do your funding?

We were introduced to NFG [and its program] Funders for Justice by a colleague in health philanthropy. NFG and FFJ have the connections to organizations that are deeply entrenched in the justice realm with a focus on communities of color. NFG and FFJ have helped us to think about ways that Langeloth can be responsive to community needs, and has exposed us to areas and fields that we haven’t traditionally waded into, such as policing.