October 17, 2018

NFG Member Spotlight: The Jacob & Valeria Langeloth Foundation

The Jacob & Valeria Langeloth Foundation focuses on health and well-being, prioritizing correctional health issues along with chronic violence and community health.

We asked Langeloth's President, Scott Moyer, to talk about their work and how membership with NFG is shaping their thinking.


The Jacob & Valeria Langeloth Foundation logo

Langeloth is part of a number of funder collaboratives, including the Fund for a Safer Future (addressing gun violence), Four Freedoms Fund (supporting immigrant rights), and the Funders’ Collaborative on Youth Organizing/Youth for Safety and Justice Fund (rapid response funding to youth-led safety and justice organizing), among others. How does Langeloth see collaborative funds as valuable pathways to learning about entering these funding spaces?

Funder collaboratives are a useful vehicle for entering a funding area in which we don’t have a lot of knowledge or exposure. In addition to ensuring that funding goes to organizations in need, they also provide access to other funders and a community to learn more about a particular field. We are a better grantmaker as a result of being part of these collaboratives.

Can you share more about Langeloth’s rapid response work, including why rapid response funding is so critical at this moment?

Langeloth established a rapid response fund for urgent needs related to politically-motivated actions. We only have two Board meetings per year and some work can’t wait months to be funded. For example, the foundation coordinated with other funders from the Fund for a Safer Future to identify organizations poised to act after the Parkland, FL shooting.  We made several grants to organizations serving youth of color, as well as one to conduct voter registration at the marches across the county. More recently, with guidance from the Four Freedoms Fund, we awarded several grants to organizations responding to the immigrant detention and family separation crisis in the border states.

In what ways has Langeloth increased its focus on supporting organizations from directly impacted communities – and what has the result been in terms of the impact of Langeloth’s funding?

This is an area of funding to which we have recently dedicated more time. We have been looking more intentionally at funding organizations serving men and boys of color as part of our community violence programming. Our focus recently has been on youth leadership development, as well as initiatives seeking to change the narrative around violence and the portrayal of men and boys of color. We are early on in this journey but believe that it is critical to support directly impacted communities as part of the solution.

Finally, share a bit about Langeloth’s history with NFG – how has NFG membership enhanced Langeloth’s learning and influenced the way you do your funding?

We were introduced to NFG [and its program] Funders for Justice by a colleague in health philanthropy. NFG and FFJ have the connections to organizations that are deeply entrenched in the justice realm with a focus on communities of color. NFG and FFJ have helped us to think about ways that Langeloth can be responsive to community needs, and has exposed us to areas and fields that we haven’t traditionally waded into, such as policing

February 28, 2020

NFG Newsletter - February 2020

February is Black History Month and, in this newsletter, NFG honors Black resistance. Given the persistence of structural racism and the legacies of segregation, NFG has mobilized philanthropy to support POC-led organizing for equitable development since our start 40 years ago. Through our member-led and local advisor-led programming, we are lifting up how Black communities are reclaiming land ownership and addressing the racial wealth gap through grassroots power building.

At the beginning of the month, NFG’s Amplify Fund staff and steering committee spent a day with local organizers, non-profit leaders, and organizations in Charleston and Edisto Island, South Carolina — one of Amplify’s eight sites. Both national and local grantmakers learned alongside some of Amplify’s grantees, including the Center for Heirs’ Property PreservationLow Country Alliance for Model CommunitiesCarolina Youth Action Project, and South Carolina Association for Community and Economic Development, which are bringing together Black, Latinx communities and youth in the region to fight for community power, land rights, and environmental justice in the face of corporate power, criminalization of communities of color due to gentrification, and land theft.

This week, NFG’s Democratizing Development Program (DDP) hosted a two-day Health, Housing, Race, Equity and Power Funders Convening in Oakland, California. Over 100 participants grappled with how anti-Blackness and xenophobia fuel the complex housing & health crisis and community trauma, and heard examples of concrete organizing wins led by Black women from Moms 4 Housing and Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment. Organizers from around the country urged grantmakers to significantly invest in long-term general operating support, community ownership models, POC leadership, and 501(c)4 funding for Black, Indigenous, and POC communities engaging in policy and systems change around housing affordability and justice. 

From Amplify’s funder collaborative to the DDP convening’s planning committee, funders organizing other funders has been a key part of our work. Funder members: how are you stepping up as an organizer and moving more resources for power building in Black, Indigenous, and POC communities? We invite you to connect with NFG staffprograms, and upcoming events — including our National Convening — and be part of our community where we bring funders together to learn, connect, and mobilize resources with an intersectional and place-based focus. 

Onwards,
The NFG team

Read the full newsletter.

January 23, 2020

NFG Newsletter - January 2020

Animated fireworks with the text "40 Years Strong"

This year marks NFG's 40th anniversary. During our early years, NFG was one of the few spaces in philanthropy specifically focused on people of color-led, grassroots organizing, and power building as the key to effective social change strategies. Today, NFG continues to be many funders' political home at a time when moving resources to struggles for justice is critically important: communities of color are bearing the brunt of the housing crisis, growing wealth and income inequality, and climate change; white nationalist backlash is rising; and our democracy is profoundly threatened. NFG is a space to draw support, deepen relationships, and find co-conspirators as we propel philanthropy to shift power and money towards justice and equity.

In 2020, the NFG network is continuing to explore structural racism in health and housing, racial capitalism, migrant worker justice in rural areas, reimagining community safety and justice, and more. We will also return ‘home’ to NFG’s founding city — Washington, D.C. — for our 2020 National Convening.

As we celebrate 40 years, our dynamic community of grantmakers and grassroots leaders is what makes us strong. This newsletter spotlights The Libra Foundation, an NFG member that shares our commitment to organizing funders in moving more resources to frontline communities and movements.

Keep reading below for more opportunities to engage with NFG. Whether you are new to NFG or a long-time member, we look forward to collaborating with you to accelerate racial, gender, economic, and climate justice.
 
Onwards,
The NFG team

Read the full newsletter.