Ensuring the Voices of Government Reflect the People They Represent

By Rashad Robinson, Executive Director of Color of Change, and Cristobal Joshua Alex, President of Latino Victory Project. Huffington Post, October 14, 2014.
It has been more than a month since the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown and the highly militarized and repressive police response to the rallies and demonstrations that came in its wake. The scenes still seem misplaced, as if taken from a history book illustrating the height of the Civil Rights Movement in 1964. Yes, in 2014, 50 years after the Civil Rights Act, African-American and Latino communities are still fighting to end systemic discrimination, and for the inclusion of our voices and concerns in the national dialogue. There are Fergusons all over the country. In many cities, discriminatory, abusive, and unconstitutional policing threaten the lives and dignity of black and Latino people. Our families and loved ones are disproportionately subjected to unwarranted and invasive stops and searches; inhumane treatment in deportation and detention facilities; and in the worst circumstances, deadly attacks. United in our struggle, we must work together to strengthen our political power and hold public officials, law enforcement, and the media accountable to our concerns. With a growing number of elections decided by the power of black and Latino voters, and national leaders paying more attention to discriminatory and violent policing than they have for years, we are in a historic moment as we head into this mid-term election, where the nation's attention is focused on these police abuses. There is a path forward for creating long-lasting change in the injustices targeting communities of color, and it must begin with making sure elected officials speak for us. Read the full article.
May 21, 2021

Redefining the social & employment contract: NFG's May 2021 Newsletter

The imagination, ingenuity, and power of workers, neighbors, and organizers in regions across the country are bigger than the crises they face. NFG’s Building Power in Place (BPP) project bridges organizers and funders with place-specific research highlighting groundbreaking community and worker organizer strategies. BPP showcases the realities of what building power in place looks like and offers funder recommendations for supporting the work.

Photo courtesy of Workers Defense Project.

In Houston, Texas, communities face climate change-fueled hurricanes and disastrous freezes. Shameless voter suppression. Runaway speculation on development. Unchecked evictions. Giant corporate tax havens that allow companies off the hook — even for worker’s compensation.

Houston’s grassroots organizations are holding corporate developers, city and county officials, fossil fuel companies, land-grabbing universities and more to task for creating a haven for low-wage work, climate insecurity and displacement. Spurred by turning points like Hurricane Harvey, new coalitions have solidified that are connecting the dots between issues like voter’s rights, speculation-driven construction, gutted public services, and xenophobia targeting migrants. Movements are successfully shifting power at the county level and on contracting while piloting a new generation of green infrastructure and just transition from fossil fuels.

Following the model set by Houston funders, NFG’s Funders for a Just Economy program is bringing together funders across economic justice, civic engagement, housing, immigration, environmental justice and more. We are organizing grantmakers to join us next Thursday, May 27th at 12-1:30pm CDT to learn more and strategize about the expanding movement infrastructure redefining the social and employment contract in Houston. We’ll dialogue directly about where funders can develop local partnerships that carry a national impact. See more information in the newsletter, and register today for this dynamic meeting.

read the newsletter

May 4, 2021

Introducing Philanthropy Foward: Cohort 3

 

We are excited to announce the launch of Philanthropy Forward's Cohort 3 in partnership with The Aspen Institute Forum for Community Solutions!

Philanthropy Forward is a CEO fellowship community for visionary leaders who center racial and gender justice and community power building to disrupt and transform the future of philanthropy. This fellowship brings together CEOs of foundations who are supporting racial & gender justice and community power building to make deeper change at the individual, organizational, and philanthropic field levels.

  • ALEYAMMA MATHEW, she/her — Collective Future Fund
  • AMORETTA MORRIS, she/her — Borealis Philanthropy
  • ANA CONNER, they/she — Third Wave Fund
  • CARLA FREDERICKS, she/her — The Christensen Fund
  • CRAIG DRINKARD, he/him — Victoria Foundation
  • JENNIFER CHING, she/her — North Star Fund
  • JOHN BROTHERS, he/him — T. Rowe Price Foundation
  • KIYOMI FUJIKAWA, she/her — Third Wave Fund
  • LISA OWENS, she/her — Hyams Foundation
  • MOLLY SCHULTZ HAFID, she/her — Butler Family Fund
  • NICOLE PITTMAN, she/her — Just Beginnings Collaborative
  • PHILIP LI, he/him — Robert Sterling Clark Foundation
  • RAJASVINI BHANSALI, she/they — Solidaire Network & Solidaire Action Fund
  • RINI BANERJEE, she/her — Jessie Smith Noyes Foundation
  • TANUJA DEHNE, she/her — Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation
  • YANIQUE REDWOOD, she/her — Consumer Health Foundation

learn more about each Fellow!

With a framework focused on liberated gatekeeping, accountability practices, and strategic risk taking, Philanthropy Forward is a dedicated space for leaders to organize together and boldly advance the transformed future of the sector. This growing fellowship of visionary CEOs from progressive philanthropic institutions is aligning to disrupt and transform the future of philanthropy.

Philanthropy Forward is a joint initiative started in 2018 by Neighborhood Funders Group and The Aspen Institute Forum for Community Solutions. Learn more about the fellowship here.