March 8, 2016

Feature: Freedom Inc.’s Creative Response to the Criminalization of Black Communities in Madison, Wisconsin

Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice has been supporting Freedom Inc. (FI) for 4 years. FI was founded in 2003, is based in Madison, WI and has used particularly creative and inspiring strategies to respond to oppression, racism and violence. FI works to end violence within and against low and no income communities of color. They work at the intersection of prison abolition, LGBT rights, education rights, and reproductive justice. FI aims to challenge the fundamental root causes of violence through leadership development and community organizing in Black and Southeast Asian, particularly Hmong communities in Madison. Their programs also aim to change cultural norms into which young people are socialized and build capacity for youth as leaders in their communities to organize for institutional change and accountability. In 2001, FI was recognized by Obama as a “champion of change” for their work against gender based violence.

On March 6th of this year, Tony Robinson a 19 year-old, “was shot five times and killed by Officer Matt Kenny in a stairwell at a friend’s apartment. Tony’s friend called the police seeking help for his friend, who was allegedly jumping in and out of traffic. However, instead of helping him, Officer Kenny broke into the apartment and fatally shot him five times.” As part of the Young, Gifted and Black Coalition, FI has worked tirelessly to bring attention to the issue of police brutality in light of Robinson’s murder. Rather than a federal investigation, the coalition has called for the UN Human Rights Commission and Organization of American States investigation to examine the murder.

Since Mike Brown’s murder in Ferguson, FI youth have been building solidarity with Ferguson activists and sharing their Human Rights framework. According to their online petition, “the greater Madison, Wisconsin area, including all of Dane County, is home to some of the greatest racial disparities in the United States. The Black unemployment rate is 5 times higher than that of Whites, and 54% of Blacks live in poverty compared to 8.7% of Whites. Black people make up just 4.8% of Dane County's general population, but 44% of the new jail inmate population, the highest racial arrest disparity in the United States.” FI is also demanding that Dane County officials reject the proposed jail expansion, release the 350 Black inmates incarcerated as part of structural racism, end the practices that got them in jail in the first place and invest the $8 million that is not spent on incarcerating Black communities on Black led initiatives in Madison.

Along with FI, Astraea’s other grantee partners are carrying out “Know Your Rights” trainings and producing police training manuals for the fair treatment of LGBTQ people; using transformative justice approaches to hate violence; mobilizing against policies that criminalize LGBTQ migrants; getting police departments to adopt LGBT protocols and working to abolish the Prison Industrial Complex. In the past two years, Streetwise and Safe and Audre Lorde Project worked with Communities United for Police Reform, a cross-movement coalition, to pass the Community Safety Act in NYC. Community United Against Violence pushed to pass historic legislation limiting ICE's controversial fingerprint-sharing "Secure Communities" (S-Comm) program in California and preventing the criminalization of queer and trans migrants. Providence Youth Student Movement moved forward the Rhode Island Racial Profiling Prevention Act and is working to pass the City of Providence Community Safety Act, Audre Lorde Project helped pass the Medicaid and Welfare Justice Campaign that provides trans* inclusive health care in New York, and Power Inside worked to pass the Healthy Births for Incarcerated Women Act in Maryland.

The LGBTQ organizations we support are led by the people most affected by systems of oppression: people of color, youth, trans women of color, people in the sex trades, homeless or unstably housed people, migrants and people with experience of incarceration. Their work is intersectional at its core, bringing together issues of race, gender identity and expression, sexuality, class and immigration status, among others. Astraea’s focus on anti-criminalization reflects a priority identified by the movement. A report published by FIERCE in 2014 Moving Up, Fighting Back: Creating a Path to LGBTQ Youth Liberation, revealed that the most critical issues impacting LGBTQ youth today are criminalization; policing; lack of housing; immigration restrictions; and concerns of safety and violence, including bias violence, school-based violence, and intimate partner/ sexual violence. Astraea understands criminalization and policing not as isolated cases of discrimination but as symptoms of systemic and structural oppression. Our support to these organizations and movements aims to:

  • Increase police accountability, policies, protocols and measures to decrease police abuse against LGBTQ people.
  • Increase the resiliency and leadership capacity of populations most affected by criminalization.
  • Increase the safety and wellbeing of LGBTQ people through transformative justice, healing justice, and other creative responses to violence.
  • Strengthen connectivity, communication, and synergy between LGBTQ organizations working against criminalization at a national level.

In the last four decades, Astraea’s U.S. Fund has strategically directed grants to people of color- led organizations and projects that advance LGBTQ racial and economic justice. In the past three years we have been listening and learning from our grantee partners and from the grassroots movements they lead, and we have deepened our commitment to support organizations and initiatives that stand against the criminalization of LGBTQI people of color and immigrant communities and that increase their safety. These organizations work against different forms of violence including interpersonal and institutional violence such as police violence and laws/policies that criminalize aspects of LGBTQ people’s lives, dignity and livelihoods.

We are inspired by the work of Freedom Inc. and our grantee partners who have been carving the rode for this current movement moment for over fifteen years.

March 17, 2021

How Philanthropy Can Move from Crisis to Transformation

Dimple Abichandani, Executive Director of the General Service Foundation, urges grantmakers and the philanthropic sector to take concrete actions to defend democracy and speak out against racist attacks on people of color. This post was originally published here by the Trust-Based Philanthropy Project.

Dimple was part of the first Philanthropy Forward: Leadership for Change Fellowship cohort, a joint initiative of Neighborhood Funders Group and The Aspen Institute Forum for Community Solutions. General Service Foundation, which partners with grassroots organizations to bring about a more just and sustainable world, is a member of NFG.


  

Dimple AbichandaniIt was just a year ago, and yet it feels like a lifetime.

Last March, I was dreading a hectic month packed with too much work travel. Long before we had heard of Covid-19, many of us had been preparing for 2020 to be a consequential year, one in which our democracy was on the line.

My mother had generously traveled from Houston to help with childcare during my travels. Her two-week visit turned into three months, and our worlds as we knew them changed.

Covid happened.  

Then the racial justice uprisings happened.

The wildfires happened.

The election happened. 

And then an armed insurrection to overturn the democratic election results happened.

Every turn in this tumultuous year reaffirmed the reality that justice is a matter of life and death. 

Our democracy survived, though barely. But more than half a million Americans did not, and this unfathomable loss, borne disproportionately by communities of color, is still growing.

Across the philanthropic sector, funders stepped up to meet the moment. We saw payouts increase, the removal of unnecessary bureaucracy, and commitments to flexible support from not only public and private foundations but also individual philanthropists who gave unrestricted billions.

A year ago, we all faced a rapidly changing reality — one that it made it hard to know what the next month, or next year might hold.  Now, we have turned a corner in a most consequential time in American democracy, a time that has been defined by the leadership of Black women and grassroots movements for social justice that are building the power of people — and these movements are just getting started. There is momentum for change, leadership that is solidly poised to make that change, and broad-based support for the bold solutions that will move us towards a more just and equitable society.  We are in a dramatically different time that continues to call for a dramatically different kind of philanthropy.

As we look back on this year of crisis, and see the opportunities before us now more clearly, how are funders being called to contribute to the change we know is needed?  To answer these questions, I point to the truths that remained when everything else fell away.

We have the power to change the rules.

In the early days of the pandemic, close to 800 foundations came together and pledged to provide their grantees with flexible funding and to remove burdens and barriers that divert them from their work. Restrictions on funding were waived, and additional funds were released. These changes were not the result of years-long strategic planning; instead, this was a rare example of strategic action. These quick shifts allowed movement leaders to be responsive to rapidly shifting needs. Grantees were more free to act holistically, to mobilize collectively, make shared demands, and achieve staggering change.

Today, our grantees are coping with the exhaustion, burnout, and trauma from this last year, the last four years, and even the last four hundred years. Recently, many of us have begun to invest more intentionally in the healing, sustainability, and wellness of our grantees. Systemic injustice takes a toll on a very individual human level, and as funders, we can and should resource our grantees to thrive.

Ash-Lee Woodard Henderson, Co-Executive Director of the Highlander Research and Education Center, has urged philanthropy to, “Fund us like you want us to win.” Last year, we learned that we are capable of doing just that — and doing it without delay. Let’s build on funding practices that center relationships and shift power to our grantees.

White supremacy got us into this mess; racial justice will get us out.

Racial justice went mainstream in 2020 as the multiple crises exposed deep inequities and injustices in our midst. In the months after the world witnessed a police officer brutally murder George Floyd, many funders responded with explicit new commitments to fund Black-led racial justice work. These standalone funding commitments have been hailed as a turning point in philanthropy — a recognition of the importance of resourcing racial justice movements.

As we move forward, we must ensure that these newly made commitments are durable and not just crisis-driven. Movements should not have to rely on heartbreaking headlines to drive the flow of future resources. We can build on new funding commitments by centering racial justice in all our grantmaking. As resources begin to flow, let’s ensure that our frameworks are intersectional and include a gender analysis. To demonstrate a true desire to repair, heal, and build a multiracial democracy, philanthropy must do meaningful work in our institutions so that, at all levels, there is an understanding of the root causes of inequality and the importance of investing in racial justice.  Rashad Robinson, President of Color of Change, captured the centrality of this when he said, “We don’t get racial justice out of a true democracy. We get a true democracy out of racial justice.”

We know how to be “all in” when it's important. In this next period, it’s important.

With crisis as the rationalization, many endowed foundations were inspired to suspend a practice that our sector has long taken for granted: the 5% minimum distribution rule. In the face of compounding threats to our lives and our democracy, 64 individuals and foundations pledged to increase spending to 10% of the value of their endowment in 2020. And for the first time in years, the philanthropic sector is giving meaningful attention to the topic of spending decisions and the problem of treating the payout floor as though it is the ceiling.

To take full advantage of this once-in-a-generation opening for transformation, funders must put all the tools in our toolbox behind our ambitious missions. Social justice philanthropy can build new spending models that are not only more responsive to the moment, but also set our institutions up to better fulfill our missions — today and in the long-term.

This past summer, 26 million people marched in the streets of their small and large cities to proclaim that Black lives matter. It was the largest mobilization in our country’s history. Last fall, despite numerous efforts to suppress voters, social justice organizers mobilized the largest voter turnout we’ve ever seen. Now, as a result, we are in a moment that holds immense possibility. 

In big and small ways, we are all changed by this year. 

Our sector and our practice of philanthropy has changed too.  Let’s claim the opportunity that is before us by reimagining our norms and adopting practices that will continue to catalyze transformation.  The old philanthropy has been exposed as unfit. The new philanthropy is ours to create.

March 25, 2021

Philanthropy must be accountable: NFG's March 2021 Newsletter

We need each other and all of us in the fight for racial, gender, economic, and climate justice. The latest incidents of hate against AAPI women, elders, and our communities have left us grieving, angry, tired, and steadfast in our commitment to make philanthropy more accountable to AAPI, Black, Indigenous, and people of color communities and low-income communities. See our full statement calling on all of us to Stop Asian Hate.

As Dimple Abichandani, Executive Director of General Service Foundation, said in Neighborhood Funders Group’s 40 Years Strong convening series, "We must create cultures of accountability. How are we meeting this moment? A lot of what we need to do could be called organizing, but I think of it as meaning making." It is our collective work to make meaning of systemic injustices and resource power-building led by AAPI, Black, Indigenous, and people of color communities at the level that is necessary for all of us to thrive.

NFG is holding philanthropy accountable by urging funders to utilize all of their institution’s assets to pursue social justice, center worker justice movements and strategies, strengthen organizing infrastructure built by Black women to shift political and economic power, support reparations and drive wealth back to Black and Indigenous communities, and reimagine public safety and community care to ensure everyone has a place to call home.

In the next few weeks, we'll be announcing more opportunities to connect with the NFG community, sharing Funders for a Just Economy's next Building Power in Place report featuring organizers in Texas, and releasing a new report on rural organizing in New York state commissioned by Engage New York and NFG's Integrated Rural Strategies Group.


In solidarity,
The NFG team

Read the newsletter

Find More By:

News type: