April 27, 2018

FFJ Advisor Discussion Series: Mary Hooks

Next up in FFJ’s series of interviews with our AdvisorsMary Hooks, Co-Director of Southerners on New Ground (SONG) and a leader of the National Bail Out. Make sure to check out the new Until Freedom Comes Bail Out Toolkit, from the National Bail Out. We asked Mary to tell us about a recent win on bail reform with the Atlanta city council, what visionary organizing looks like, and what funders can do in this moment. 

Congratulations on this week’s win on bail reform in Atlanta, Georgia! What type of organizing and coalition work did it take to make this possible? What’s next to build on this win? How is the momentum building across the country?

There were several organizations and groups that contributed to the bail reform in Atlanta.  Many of the organizational relationships are years old and we have done work together in the past.  We’ve been on the front lines during rapid response, done workshops and town halls, bailed out Black Mamas and broken bread together.  Relational organizing has allowed us to work and struggle together.  This was not the visionary policy that we envisioned, however, we did see an opportunity to move the dial on the issue and change the narrative about bail reform.  Those things happened and we have some ways to go.  We will be working with members of the commission to monitor and evaluate the implementation of the new policy, begin developing a needs assessment pilot, and provide a 6-month report back on the reforms.  Across the country, people are being inspired by the fights that are happening to end money bail as well as the bail out actions that have been sweeping the nation since last year’s Black Mama’s Day Bail Out.  Some of this is in part due to the lawsuits that are creating some urgency inside of municipalities to stop wealth-based bail systems.

Tell us more about visionary organizing. How do you think it’s different than traditional organizing or policy advocacy? Are the outcomes different? 

Visionary organizing has more to do with creating the space inside of organizations to be willing to take risk than having a grand vision of the future.  It’s about being able to see possibilities where it looks bleak and taking collective risk to make the impossible, possible.   What is different is what it does to our hearts and minds.  It opens up more space to be collectively vulnerable, to experiment, and to hope.  When we engage in that type of organizing, we may not get the policies, but our lives will never be the same.

And, congratulations to you and the SONG family on the 25-year anniversary of SONG’s founding! What are some of the biggest learnings and most uplifting discoveries that you and SONG have had? 

We have learned so many lessons and many of those lessons have been passed down to me and others.  We are more certain that relationships are the strongest infrastructure we have and we need each other.  We are clear that there is a difference between respectability and earning respect.  We know that we have lasted this long because we have been nimble, we haven’t pretended to know everything, and we are as honest about our failures as we are about our successes.

What should funders be doing to support the growth of organizations and movements right now? 

Listening and taking action.  Over the last few years, I’ve had the opportunity and responsibility to navigate spaces where funders are convened.   There are at a minimum three basic things that I have heard over and over again:

  1. Provide General operating support and grants
  2. Reduce the amount of time necessary to apply for and report on grants
  3. Reparations

Mary Hooks joined the SONG team as a field organizer for the state of Alabama in March 2011. Her passion for helping people is reflected in her years of community service and mentoring. Mary’s background is in Human Resources and holds a Master of Business Administration with a focus in Human Resources Management and recently obtained her Professional in Human Resources (PHR) certification. Though Mary is new to organizing, her personal story has prepared her for such a time as this. The chapters of her life begin with a life of poverty, being parentless, and shy. Eventually the story unfolds of a rebellious teenager who converts to a devoted Christian in Pentecostal church, who comes out as a lesbian and left without the support of her foster or church family and stricken with tons of Christian guilt. The climax of this story occurs when, in undergrad at a private Lutheran college, Mary begins to redefine her self and discovered a radical desire to be a catalyst for change in the world. Since then Mary has relocated to the hot shades of Atlanta, GA, and has found her niche in organizing with SONG, throwing dope parties and singing with the Juicebox Jubilees, a queer choir, created to provide a safe space for folks to gather their voices together, sip a little wine, and sing songs that uplift, inspire, and liberate. As she continues to navigate through movement work, she hopes that the folks she connects with are inspired to write their stories of self-determination, liberation, and love. You can reach Mary at mary@southernersonnewground.org



In the spring of 2017, Funders for Justice (FFJ) launched its inaugural cohort of Advisors – nine field leaders recognized for their leadership in community power-building, racial and gender justice, police accountability campaigns, and anti-criminalization movements. We asked them to share their insights on the current political climate, how we can build a vision for the world we want, and what funders can do in this moment. 

Find More By:

News type: 
February 12, 2019

FFJ Advisor Discussion Series: Marisa Franco

Marisa Franco, FFJ Field Advisor and Director and Co-founder of of Mijente, a digital and grassroots hub for Latinx and Chicanx organizing and movement building, speaks on the current political moment and how funders can contribute to movement work.

Tell us about the particular moment you are in with your work and place in the movement.

Entering into our fourth year, we are doing our best to be a vehicle to both respond to the real-time challenges our communities face and a place to find respite, connection, and replenished meaning. Given what the Latinx and Chicanx community faces, we’ve got to walk and chew gum at the same time (and hop on one leg, juggle, and balance something on our head!) but we believe that through the continued growth where organizers, healers, change-makers, designers, and disrupters feel Mijente is a place to meaningfully contribute to collective liberation means we are going in the right direction. It is my view that our most critical task at this time is growth and recruitment - millions of people are becoming exposed to the injustice and summarily wrong direction we are heading in - our organizations must be open and accessible entry points for people to contribute to moving us in the right direction.

How do you understand the political moment that we’re in? What do you think we need to do differently right now?

Ultimately I think that lots of what we reference as threats that are coming are largely here - crisis as a result of climate change is here, it’s being felt across the planet. The extreme backlash and attempt to re-entrench power due to demographic change is here, occurring in localities across the United States. Authoritarianism is a growing threat beyond Donald Trump and within the domestic United States. Given all of this, at the very least I think it’s critical we start to widen our panorama of political understanding to include outside of the United States and make the connections internationally. Rest assured, our adversaries are in coordination - we ignore our movement siblings and the struggle outside of the United States to our own detriment.

What should funders be understanding in this political moment? What should funders be doing to support organizations and movements?

What’s important to understand in this political moment is how the volatility impacts the plans, perspective, and morale of people in organizations and social movements. It has become more and more difficult to lay out plans that feel real given how normal it's become for so much to turn upside down pretty regularly. Some understanding and support of this from funders, particularly when it means proposed work is not carried out in the way it was initially described, is very helpful.

Continued support for rapid response tactics is critical, as well as funds that help convene key groups and/or leaders in this time goes a long way. In times like these, those that are able to adapt and move quickly are well positioned to make impactful changes. These folks have got to be able to do so with enough support and not too many hurdles, hoops, and paper to be able to move. So some of these existing practices around simplifying processes, making funds available for rapid response activities, and pop up convenings is something that has been helpful thus far and is important to continue.

December 10, 2018

Welcome to the new NFG website!

Thank you for visiting Neighborhood Funders Group's new website! We've completely redesigned and improved how it works to make it easier than ever for our members to use as an online resource.

What new features can you find on the site?

  • Search the entire website for news, events, and resources using the search bar at the top of every page
  • See where all of the members of our national network are based, right on our member map 
  • Discover more related content, tagged by topic and format, at the bottom of every page
  • Look up NFG member organizations in our member directory
  • Log in to view individual contacts in the member directory and register for events in the future

First check to see if your account has already been created for you by clicking "Forgot Password" on the log in page. Try entering your email address to activate your account and set your password.

Let us know at support@nfg.org if you come across any issues logging in, or anywhere else on the site.

Find More By:

News type: