September 12, 2016

Foundation for Louisiana Supports Baton Rouge Organizing with Rapid Response Fund

This press release was originally released by Foundation for Louisiana on July 21, 2016 at https://www.foundationforlouisiana.org/news/75/rapid-response-fund.


 

Baton Rouge, LA — Foundation for Louisiana (FFL) stands in solidarity with the Baton Rouge community and people across Louisiana and across the nation who are outraged, hurt and engaged by the fatal shootings of Alton Sterling, Deputy Brad Garafola with East Baton Rouge Sheriff’s Office and officers Matthew Gerald and Montrell Jackson of the Baton Rouge Police Department — as well as the three other injured police officers.

Urgent situations such as community emergency and disasters require swift, on-the-ground philanthropic responses and ongoing strategic analysis. Supported with seed funding from the Executives’ Alliance for Boys and Men of Color, the FFL Rapid Response Fund has now been activated. The Executives’ Alliance funding will cover administrative costs and will ensure that all monies donated will go directly to the organizations working on the frontlines. The fund is accepting investments from both institutional and individual donors who are interested in supporting individuals and organizations who are on the front lines in organizing around systemic issues of police violence, police-community
relations, the right to protest and policy reform.

The longstanding distrust between police and communities of color, at times like this, is most evident. We recognize that this distrust is the result of the unresolved legacy of slavery and racism, which has resulted in the criminalization and mass incarceration of black and brown people at alarmingly disproportionate rates. This is particularly true in Louisiana where there are well-documented cases of police brutality, that are illustrative of the troubled history between police and people of color that dates back hundreds of years. That is why, even during difficult times like these, we stand in solidarity with those demanding justice and who are pushing honest conversations that will bring about solutions. While we grieve the loss of lives, we must also continue to demand an end to police violence, eliminate racial disparities in the criminal justice system and build trust between police and the communities they serve.

“We’re reminded by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in his letter from a Birmingham jail, ‘We must use time creatively, in the knowledge that the time is always ripe to do right,’” said Flozell Daniels Jr., Foundation for Louisiana’s CEO. “Now, more than ever, we must honor the many innocent lives lost to police violence by resourcing the people who are leading the charge to achieve justice and equal accountability for everyone. These are times for courage, unabridged love for humanity and laser-focused attention on practices that work to ensure everyone receives justice and safety.”

To invest in the FFL Rapid Response Fund, please visit www.foundationforlouisiana.donate or call FFL Programs A at 225-383-1672 for more details. More information including grant guidelines and application can be found at https://www.foundationforlouisiana.org/news/75/rapid-response-fund.

Foundation for Louisiana (FFL) is a social justice, statewide philanthropy and intermediary based in Baton Rouge whose mission is to invest in people and practices that work to reduce vulnerability and build stronger, more sustainable communities. Founded in the disaster times of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita more than 10 years ago, FFL remains a solution partner and equity advocate for and with people in traditionally excluded communities and funders that are allied with them.

For more information, contact:
Ameca A. Reali
New Orleans Program Officer
Foundation for Louisiana 225-772-7060 (m) | 225-383-1672 (o)
areali@foundationforlouisiana.org

April 21, 2022

(Re)Sharing NFG's National Convening update + more events: NFG's April 2022 Newsletter

Neighborhood Funders Group is re-sharing the announcement about our National Convening that we made earlier this month.  

We are shifting the timing of our National Convening in Wilmington, North Carolina from June 2022 to Spring 2023.

Convening is NFG’s ‘superpower,’ and the most frequently named reason for why we are many funders’ political home in philanthropy. Many of us are feeling more open to in-person connection with funder colleagues and grantee partners; excitement about the post-session hallway scheming that happens at NFG convenings; and ready for the impromptu fun that comes from in-person time together, including late night (Covid-safe!) karaoke sessions with both new and long-time friends and colleagues. And, we're continuing to be mindful that we have not been at a moment like this ever before in our lifetimes.

The decision to shift our convening to 2023 was informed by ongoing, thoughtful conversations with NFG’s staff & board of directors, our convening co-chairs who are grantmakers in the region, our Amplify Fund grantee partners that are building power in Eastern North Carolina, and our event planners (Girl Friday Events) about Covid considerations and how & when we want to intentionally regather in-person.

How we regather and build community as safely and accessibly as possible during an ongoing pandemic — where there are no known/clear solutions — requires all of us to think as adaptive leaders. How we come back together as a community requires more conversations, time, and co-created paths forward.

Over the next months, we will continue our convening program planning. When we come back together for this National Convening in 2023, we’re committed to creating a convening space that is rooted in joy, camaraderie, care, and fun; showcases how groups in Eastern North Carolina are building power locally; and moves money to BIPOC communities. Our first convening back together in-person after more than two years will be nothing short of a spectacular reunion. 

Stay tuned for more convening announcements to come! And keep reading for our robust list of upcoming events hosted by NFG and our partners, including:

In community,
The NFG Team

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March 24, 2022

Sharing NFG's refreshed theory of change: NFG's March 2022 Newsletter

Neighborhood Funders Group has shared snippets of our new theory of change in each of our newsletters so far this year. 

In January, we unveiled our long-term outcome: Philanthropic assets are liberated so that BIPOC communities and low-income communities have power to self-determine. In February, we applied this outcome to NFG’s Funders for a Just Economy program — which organizes funders committed to supporting economic justice and worker power to rebuild an economy and democracy that works for all, ensures good quality jobs, and promotes prosperity and health. 

Now, we’re excited to share our full theory of change! This process started in 2021 when we revisited our initial strategic framework that was developed three years prior. A board and staff committee came together for this work. We spoke to co-chairs of NFG programs. And we worked with the phenomenal Luminare Group who also partnered with us in 2018 on our initial strategic framework.

We began by affirming what we still held as true and core in our strategic framework while also naming our curiosities. What we found (and still find) unique and powerful in the process of developing our theory of change are the conversations and connections, the clarity named, and the commitments made. Over the course of 2021, we affirmed and refined these elements of our theory of change: the problem we seek to address, our guiding principles and values, assumptions, context, strategies and our outcomes. We also identified the evidence (empirical and experiential) that informs us. We did this so that we can be clear on our commitments, push ourselves and our work, learn from what we try on, and be accountable to you and each other.

As I shared in my January message: We know that this is a critical time for philanthropy. More people are amassing wealth, leading to more billionaires entering philanthropy and the creation of more DAFs and private foundations. There continues to be wealth hoarding among individual and foundation donors. Many foundations persist in adhering to a minimum 5% payout while endowments continue to grow. And we are seeing some positive shifts with foundations spending down the assets they’ve been holding and shifting their investment practices. Many more funders are centering trust, community power building, and decentralized decision-making in their grantmaking.

Given this context, we named key assumptions to inform our work going forward:

  • Philanthropy is at a choice point. The sector has an opportunity to shift and transform, and some grantmakers are making that choice. Others continue to pull back and maintain the status quo. 

  • Different practices are possible in philanthropy when guided by an analysis that centers root causes and intersectional analysis.

  • It will take examples and stories of how to increase spend out, transform investments, and change philanthropic practices to show the way.

  • Progress toward our theory of change outcomes will take a broad base of funders: those interested in racial, gender, economic, disability, and climate justice beginning their journey and those leading the way who are funder organizers and leaders.

  • All of us in philanthropy — Black, Indigenous, people of color, and white people — can transform our understanding to be greater leaders for justice. Even though all of us are implicated, who leads matters! Who is leading will shape how and what we fund.  

Our refreshed theory of change document is a commitment, an aspiration, and a blueprint for how NFG wants to be in our work and in our relationships with our community.

This theory of change will move us toward the following outcomes:

  • Philanthropy is led by Black, Indigenous, and people of color leaders who have experience in building community power 

  • Philanthropic practices shift power to BIPOC communities and are grounded in trust 

  • Racial, gender, economic, disability, and climate justice is funded with all philanthropic assets 

And it will guide how we partner, plan programming, and co-conspire with our community of grantmakers to liberate philanthropic assets so that BIPOC and low-income communities have power to self-determine.

We look forward to being in community with you to make this transformation together. 
 

Onwards,
Adriana

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