The Power of the People – SB1445 is a Strategic Victory With Lessons for Alliance Building

Post by Tia Oso, National Coordinator for the Black Immigration Network and BAJI Arizona Organizer

Late Monday, in a much anticipated decision, Arizona Governor Doug Ducey vetoed Senate Bill 1445, dubbed the “Secret Police” bill. As the Movement for Black Lives shines the light of justice on the crisis of police brutality plaguing Black communities across the country, powerful Arizona police unions used their influence to introduce SB1445. The bill withheld the identity of officers that used deadly force or police brutality for 60 days, as well as redacting officer’s names from their disciplinary records.  BAJI played a key role in building a multiracial coalition of organizations and community leaders that successfully opposed the legislation through a people centered strategy. This coalition organized thousands to voice their opposition, ultimately urging Governor Ducey to veto the legislation. While we celebrate this triumphant effort, it is just as important to stay aware of maneuvers to impede progress as we fight to bend the arc of history towards justice, and seek more opportunities to build power.

The crafters of this very dangerous measure described the mandatory hold as a cooling off period and common sense step to protect officers against the “court of public opinion”. Their divisive rhetoric ignored the reality of communities plagued by state violence at the hands police, at current count 14 deaths in Arizona alone during the first 12 weeks of 2015. The measure also did nothing to address the media vilification of victims of police violence, which can be just as incendiary to public tensions. Instead, lawmakers characterized hurting families and passionate protestors as “angry mobs”,”lunatics” and “political zealots” on a mythical rampage to terrorize police and their families. This narrative worked to distract from the fact that SB1445 is a fascist, draconian piece of legislation that would have further solidified the collusion of power which allows police to abuse and kill with impunity from the state.  It is telling that the letter accompanying the Governor’s veto reflected the tone of the police      , citing other law enforcement officials, the Police Chiefs Association, as the primary reason for the veto, not community concerns. Also, cited was the deeply disturbing subsection (B) which would have redacted officer’s names from records of disciplinary action. This would have allowed discriminatory, abusive individuals to hide, making it even harder to hold officers accountable and seek civil or legal recourse. Preemptive measures such as SB1445 are a critical sign that our movement has traction and is making important progress.  We must continue to address these important opportunities for intervention, and challenge ourselves to seek more ways we can work together and commit to transformational solidarity.

While the Movement for Black Lives has succeeded in raising issues of abusive police in Black communities to the national consciousness, often unexamined is the crisis of state violence in other areas. Such as people killed by border patrol agents across the U.S./Mexico border. Same for the violence and abuse committed daily against those that are incarcerated and detained. Violence against trans people goes largely dismissed as routine, whether perpetrated by the state or private citizens. We must commit to connecting struggles and challenging the beliefs  that may keep us working in isolation.

Arizona is a testing ground for conservative legislation that targets and harms communities of color and sets precedent for other states to follow suit, as seen with SB1070. These attempts to roll back transparency and public accountability of law enforcement come at a time when it is needed most. The resistance of determined and organized people is resulting in important progress such as the successful prosecution of Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaiao for racial profiling, and the scathing Department of Justice report on the police practices in Ferguson, MO.  The victory against SB1445 is an example of what is possible when movements unite for a common purpose. As we affirm victory in a crucial battle, we must keep our eyes on the prize and continue to build and grow a movement that is inclusive, principled and ever focused on securing liberty by building multiracial alliances to advance a democracy that works for us all.

Read the original post on BAJI's website.

 

February 28, 2020

NFG Newsletter - February 2020

February is Black History Month and, in this newsletter, NFG honors Black resistance. Given the persistence of structural racism and the legacies of segregation, NFG has mobilized philanthropy to support POC-led organizing for equitable development since our start 40 years ago. Through our member-led and local advisor-led programming, we are lifting up how Black communities are reclaiming land ownership and addressing the racial wealth gap through grassroots power building.

At the beginning of the month, NFG’s Amplify Fund staff and steering committee spent a day with local organizers, non-profit leaders, and organizations in Charleston and Edisto Island, South Carolina — one of Amplify’s eight sites. Both national and local grantmakers learned alongside some of Amplify’s grantees, including the Center for Heirs’ Property PreservationLow Country Alliance for Model CommunitiesCarolina Youth Action Project, and South Carolina Association for Community and Economic Development, which are bringing together Black, Latinx communities and youth in the region to fight for community power, land rights, and environmental justice in the face of corporate power, criminalization of communities of color due to gentrification, and land theft.

This week, NFG’s Democratizing Development Program (DDP) hosted a two-day Health, Housing, Race, Equity and Power Funders Convening in Oakland, California. Over 100 participants grappled with how anti-Blackness and xenophobia fuel the complex housing & health crisis and community trauma, and heard examples of concrete organizing wins led by Black women from Moms 4 Housing and Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment. Organizers from around the country urged grantmakers to significantly invest in long-term general operating support, community ownership models, POC leadership, and 501(c)4 funding for Black, Indigenous, and POC communities engaging in policy and systems change around housing affordability and justice. 

From Amplify’s funder collaborative to the DDP convening’s planning committee, funders organizing other funders has been a key part of our work. Funder members: how are you stepping up as an organizer and moving more resources for power building in Black, Indigenous, and POC communities? We invite you to connect with NFG staffprograms, and upcoming events — including our National Convening — and be part of our community where we bring funders together to learn, connect, and mobilize resources with an intersectional and place-based focus. 

Onwards,
The NFG team

Read the full newsletter.

January 23, 2020

NFG Newsletter - January 2020

Animated fireworks with the text "40 Years Strong"

This year marks NFG's 40th anniversary. During our early years, NFG was one of the few spaces in philanthropy specifically focused on people of color-led, grassroots organizing, and power building as the key to effective social change strategies. Today, NFG continues to be many funders' political home at a time when moving resources to struggles for justice is critically important: communities of color are bearing the brunt of the housing crisis, growing wealth and income inequality, and climate change; white nationalist backlash is rising; and our democracy is profoundly threatened. NFG is a space to draw support, deepen relationships, and find co-conspirators as we propel philanthropy to shift power and money towards justice and equity.

In 2020, the NFG network is continuing to explore structural racism in health and housing, racial capitalism, migrant worker justice in rural areas, reimagining community safety and justice, and more. We will also return ‘home’ to NFG’s founding city — Washington, D.C. — for our 2020 National Convening.

As we celebrate 40 years, our dynamic community of grantmakers and grassroots leaders is what makes us strong. This newsletter spotlights The Libra Foundation, an NFG member that shares our commitment to organizing funders in moving more resources to frontline communities and movements.

Keep reading below for more opportunities to engage with NFG. Whether you are new to NFG or a long-time member, we look forward to collaborating with you to accelerate racial, gender, economic, and climate justice.
 
Onwards,
The NFG team

Read the full newsletter.