October 7, 2016

Statement from Within Our Lifetime

This rapid response statement on police killings in September 2016 was originally released by Within Our Lifetime on September 29, 2016 at http://www.withinourlifetime.net/.


 

Within Our Lifetime (WOL) supports the families of Alfred Olango, Keith Scott, Terence Crutcher, Terrence Sterling, and Tyre King (among many others) and all the people grieving, organizing and protesting for justice in El Cajon, Charlotte, Tulsa, Washington, D.C Columbus, (and beyond) in the wake of the rampant police killings of Black people across America. These tragic losses lay bare the urgent need for substantive changes in a number of areas, including law enforcement training and community oversight. We are committed to finding ways to elevate awareness of the damage inflicted by structural racism, implicit bias and racial trauma and seek opportunities for joint work and joint action toward racial equity, justice, dialogue and healing. In short, WOL is committed to ending the hierarchy of human value that exists in the United States according to race, and calls for the following:

First, law enforcement agencies locally and nationally must immediately shift administrative practices through training, professional development, and protocols of accountability dealing with implicit bias, and overt racism. Specifically, WOL demands advanced de-biasing training to decrease officer bias with accountability to the community they serve. We have all heard the video of a police officer in a helicopter in Tulsa call a Black man with his hands in the air “a bad dude”, despite no other information. In addition to becoming conscious of their internalized racism, professional development for police must also address what Camara Phyllis Jones calls personally mediated, and institutionalized racism.

Second, WOL demands specific actions to increase the capacity of the community and government to hold law enforcement officers and departments accountable. U.S. police have killed many unarmed civilians in the past 2 years, with almost no officers charged, and even fewer convicted.  We call for the U.S. Department of Justice to investigate the killings, and to expedite the creation of an oversight board within the Community Oriented Policing Services program to ensure that departments that receive funding are implementing community-centered strategies,  and at a local level governments should push their departments to have independent community oversight with the power to subpoena officers. Additionally, police precincts should be controlled by communities not by centralized power of the unions. We call for reparations for the families of those killed, and we call for a national database that prevents officers dismissed for misconduct in one police department from being hired in another.

Third, Within Our Lifetime formally endorses The Movement for Black Lives Policy Platform and urges our member organizations to do so as well as lawmakers in California, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Ohio and other state and local governments, as well as the federal government to do likewise. The need for anti-racist  and direct democratic systems that include, community oversight of police departments, and the execution of all of the initiatives described in The Movement for Black Lives Policy Demands have never been more clear.

Finally, WOL recognizes the need for immediate responsiveness to impacted communities, as well as a renewed opportunity to work toward racial equity, justice and healing.  We reject all attempts to shift the blame to individuals that have been targeted by the police – reading a book, or carrying a toy gun, or having your car break down are never acceptable reasons for violent force.  We also reject all attempts to shift blame to the people protesting in the street in the wake of these senseless killings. The issue is state-sanctioned violence, not the community’s response to that violence.

We offer our support and our resources to these most recently impacted communities, with the sad recognition that this problem will not end today. We will pay special attention to the trauma and recovery of the communities most impacted, including the Black community. It is well past time for a fundamental shift in how Black lives are valued in America.  And as communities emerge from the most significant trauma and disruption, we will make available the wisdom in our network around racial healing, and the tools to fight for policy change and racial equity. We invite you to join us in this work by becoming a member of Within Our Lifetime.

Within Our Lifetime is developing a Rapid Response protocol, in collaboration with Movement NetLab, to respond to crisis situations. In the interim our areas of support your local community can request in times of crisis for preparedness are the following:

  • Emergency Financial and Material Resources: bail fund, family fund for social support costs. Movement Registry gift supplies via Amazon.
  • Regional Racial Healing Calls: emotional emancipation processes, racial healing community circles.
  • National Unified Calls to Action: mass networked symbolic and political actions that can go viral.
  • Remote Strategy Consultations: coaching on racial justice strategies and documentation of events of the incident or watershed event through media coverage.
  • Legal Support: Know Your Rights training, Tool kits, Legal Observers

To request movement support locally in your community from our interim intake process please click here. If you would like to get involved in shaping it or one of our other workgroups, please complete this form.

Here are some ways you can assist the three communities who experienced this state sanctioned violence (additional links to be provided soon for other cities):

  • Sign petitions, volunteer or donate to Charlotte Uprising HERE.
  • Donate to Movement 4 Black Lives support efforts HERE.
  • Donate to Southern Vision Alliance Charlotte support efforts HERE.

Here are few resources to continue to learn more about the issues and to share within your organization, communities, and partners:

Referenced Links:

February 28, 2020

NFG Newsletter - February 2020

February is Black History Month and, in this newsletter, NFG honors Black resistance. Given the persistence of structural racism and the legacies of segregation, NFG has mobilized philanthropy to support POC-led organizing for equitable development since our start 40 years ago. Through our member-led and local advisor-led programming, we are lifting up how Black communities are reclaiming land ownership and addressing the racial wealth gap through grassroots power building.

At the beginning of the month, NFG’s Amplify Fund staff and steering committee spent a day with local organizers, non-profit leaders, and organizations in Charleston and Edisto Island, South Carolina — one of Amplify’s eight sites. Both national and local grantmakers learned alongside some of Amplify’s grantees, including the Center for Heirs’ Property PreservationLow Country Alliance for Model CommunitiesCarolina Youth Action Project, and South Carolina Association for Community and Economic Development, which are bringing together Black, Latinx communities and youth in the region to fight for community power, land rights, and environmental justice in the face of corporate power, criminalization of communities of color due to gentrification, and land theft.

This week, NFG’s Democratizing Development Program (DDP) hosted a two-day Health, Housing, Race, Equity and Power Funders Convening in Oakland, California. Over 100 participants grappled with how anti-Blackness and xenophobia fuel the complex housing & health crisis and community trauma, and heard examples of concrete organizing wins led by Black women from Moms 4 Housing and Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment. Organizers from around the country urged grantmakers to significantly invest in long-term general operating support, community ownership models, POC leadership, and 501(c)4 funding for Black, Indigenous, and POC communities engaging in policy and systems change around housing affordability and justice. 

From Amplify’s funder collaborative to the DDP convening’s planning committee, funders organizing other funders has been a key part of our work. Funder members: how are you stepping up as an organizer and moving more resources for power building in Black, Indigenous, and POC communities? We invite you to connect with NFG staffprograms, and upcoming events — including our National Convening — and be part of our community where we bring funders together to learn, connect, and mobilize resources with an intersectional and place-based focus. 

Onwards,
The NFG team

Read the full newsletter.

January 23, 2020

NFG Newsletter - January 2020

Animated fireworks with the text "40 Years Strong"

This year marks NFG's 40th anniversary. During our early years, NFG was one of the few spaces in philanthropy specifically focused on people of color-led, grassroots organizing, and power building as the key to effective social change strategies. Today, NFG continues to be many funders' political home at a time when moving resources to struggles for justice is critically important: communities of color are bearing the brunt of the housing crisis, growing wealth and income inequality, and climate change; white nationalist backlash is rising; and our democracy is profoundly threatened. NFG is a space to draw support, deepen relationships, and find co-conspirators as we propel philanthropy to shift power and money towards justice and equity.

In 2020, the NFG network is continuing to explore structural racism in health and housing, racial capitalism, migrant worker justice in rural areas, reimagining community safety and justice, and more. We will also return ‘home’ to NFG’s founding city — Washington, D.C. — for our 2020 National Convening.

As we celebrate 40 years, our dynamic community of grantmakers and grassroots leaders is what makes us strong. This newsletter spotlights The Libra Foundation, an NFG member that shares our commitment to organizing funders in moving more resources to frontline communities and movements.

Keep reading below for more opportunities to engage with NFG. Whether you are new to NFG or a long-time member, we look forward to collaborating with you to accelerate racial, gender, economic, and climate justice.
 
Onwards,
The NFG team

Read the full newsletter.