September 4, 2018

Are funders ready to fight for our freedom?

By Manisha Vaze, Senior Program Manager of NFG's Funders for a Just Economy

This Labor Day weekend, as we celebrate the last days of summer with barbeques and back-to-school preparation, I am thinking about how the labor movement is facing some of the most serious threats to its future. Well-funded efforts are shutting down public sector unions and workers’ ability to collectively bargain, while corporations are using their lobbying power to lock contingent and informal workers out of basic labor protections.  Companies are worming out of providing basic benefits such as health care, sick days, family leave, and fair work schedules, while also receiving significant tax breaks. These corporations are being propped up as saviors of the American workforce because of their ability to create jobs, or because of the beloved nature of their products, services, and shipping times that come at the literal expense of the workers who make, provide, and deliver these goods.

To me, it’s no accident that while the American economy is purportedly at its height, wages have continued to stagnate and workers have seen little to no benefits. The shifts in the economy have largely come from a culture of extraction of resources from companies on to shareholders and CEOs. It is part of not decades, but centuries of poor labor conditions, racist economic policies, and use of slave labor.

Moreover, we are getting distracted by the short-sighted antics of politics and politicos who are campaigning in two- and four-year cycles instead of working to build long term democratic values in our public policies and budgets. And culturally, many are more interested in maintaining their partisan identities and white supremacy than their own ability to make ends meet.

Despite this doom and gloom, what’s clear is that there is energy and motivation to bring back a culture of interdependence, collectivism, and a demand for basic rights. The current prison strike is emblematic of this energy – incarcerated people are standing up to slavery and exploitation as they are stripped of their constitutional rights. In Los Angeles, United Teachers LA just voted to authorize a strike for better pay and smaller class sizes, following many teacher strikes this year including one in Southwest Washington last week. These efforts are proof that workers will organize against the bosses and resist the authoritarian conditions that lead to their mistreatment, regardless of the cuts to legal protections and structures in place to defend workers’ rights.

These efforts also occurred without any philanthropic funding. Recent data shows that funding towards economic and labor rights are a paltry 6% of the total funding that goes towards human rights, with grassroots organizing efforts being one of the least funded. But, shifting power to create the conditions for real change requires larger investments and larger resources, and more risk taking. When workers are willing to lose wages, face extreme retaliation, and risk their livelihoods, how can we as funders stand by, citing the barriers of our program strategies and five-year plans? Now, more than ever, we need to be fighting for the future of labor and employment – one that is about the value of work and improving the quality of life for everyday people. 

Assata Shakur wrote that “It is our duty to fight for our freedom / It is our duty to win.” Funders, are we ready to do everything in our power to make sure we win?

May 21, 2021

Redefining the social & employment contract: NFG's May 2021 Newsletter

The imagination, ingenuity, and power of workers, neighbors, and organizers in regions across the country are bigger than the crises they face. NFG’s Building Power in Place (BPP) project bridges organizers and funders with place-specific research highlighting groundbreaking community and worker organizer strategies. BPP showcases the realities of what building power in place looks like and offers funder recommendations for supporting the work.

Photo courtesy of Workers Defense Project.

In Houston, Texas, communities face climate change-fueled hurricanes and disastrous freezes. Shameless voter suppression. Runaway speculation on development. Unchecked evictions. Giant corporate tax havens that allow companies off the hook — even for worker’s compensation.

Houston’s grassroots organizations are holding corporate developers, city and county officials, fossil fuel companies, land-grabbing universities and more to task for creating a haven for low-wage work, climate insecurity and displacement. Spurred by turning points like Hurricane Harvey, new coalitions have solidified that are connecting the dots between issues like voter’s rights, speculation-driven construction, gutted public services, and xenophobia targeting migrants. Movements are successfully shifting power at the county level and on contracting while piloting a new generation of green infrastructure and just transition from fossil fuels.

Following the model set by Houston funders, NFG’s Funders for a Just Economy program is bringing together funders across economic justice, civic engagement, housing, immigration, environmental justice and more. We are organizing grantmakers to join us next Thursday, May 27th at 12-1:30pm CDT to learn more and strategize about the expanding movement infrastructure redefining the social and employment contract in Houston. We’ll dialogue directly about where funders can develop local partnerships that carry a national impact. See more information in the newsletter, and register today for this dynamic meeting.

read the newsletter

May 4, 2021

Introducing Philanthropy Foward: Cohort 3

 

We are excited to announce the launch of Philanthropy Forward's Cohort 3 in partnership with The Aspen Institute Forum for Community Solutions!

Philanthropy Forward is a CEO fellowship community for visionary leaders who center racial and gender justice and community power building to disrupt and transform the future of philanthropy. This fellowship brings together CEOs of foundations who are supporting racial & gender justice and community power building to make deeper change at the individual, organizational, and philanthropic field levels.

  • ALEYAMMA MATHEW, she/her — Collective Future Fund
  • AMORETTA MORRIS, she/her — Borealis Philanthropy
  • ANA CONNER, they/she — Third Wave Fund
  • CARLA FREDERICKS, she/her — The Christensen Fund
  • CRAIG DRINKARD, he/him — Victoria Foundation
  • JENNIFER CHING, she/her — North Star Fund
  • JOHN BROTHERS, he/him — T. Rowe Price Foundation
  • KIYOMI FUJIKAWA, she/her — Third Wave Fund
  • LISA OWENS, she/her — Hyams Foundation
  • MOLLY SCHULTZ HAFID, she/her — Butler Family Fund
  • NICOLE PITTMAN, she/her — Just Beginnings Collaborative
  • PHILIP LI, he/him — Robert Sterling Clark Foundation
  • RAJASVINI BHANSALI, she/they — Solidaire Network & Solidaire Action Fund
  • RINI BANERJEE, she/her — Jessie Smith Noyes Foundation
  • TANUJA DEHNE, she/her — Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation
  • YANIQUE REDWOOD, she/her — Consumer Health Foundation

learn more about each Fellow!

With a framework focused on liberated gatekeeping, accountability practices, and strategic risk taking, Philanthropy Forward is a dedicated space for leaders to organize together and boldly advance the transformed future of the sector. This growing fellowship of visionary CEOs from progressive philanthropic institutions is aligning to disrupt and transform the future of philanthropy.

Philanthropy Forward is a joint initiative started in 2018 by Neighborhood Funders Group and The Aspen Institute Forum for Community Solutions. Learn more about the fellowship here.